Owens FAQ
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Glossary

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  • Access Point

    An access point is a device, such as a wireless router, that allows wireless devices to connect to a network. Most access points have built-in routers, while others must be connected to a router in order to provide network access. In either case, access points are typically hardwired to other devices, such as network switches or broadband modems.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>



     

  • Active Directory (AD)

     

    Is a directory service that Microsoft developed for Windows domain networks and is included in most Windows Server operating systems as a set of processes and services. An AD domain controller authenticates and authorizes all users and computers in a Windows domain type network—assigning and enforcing security policies for all computers and installing or updating software. For example, when a user logs into a computer that is part of a Windows domain, Active Directory checks the submitted password and determines whether the user is a system administrator or normal user. Active Directory makes use of Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) versions 2 and 3, Microsoft's version of Kerberos, and DNS.


    Wikipedia, 6/29/15

  • Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS)

     

    Is a software component developed by Microsoft that can be installed on Windows Server operating systems to provide users with single sign-on access to systems and applications located across organizational boundaries. It uses a claims-based access control authorization model to maintain application security and implement federated identity. Claims-based authentication is the process of authenticating a user based on a set of claims about its identity contained in a trusted token. Such a token is often issued and signed by an entity that is able to authenticate the user by other means, and that is trusted by the entity doing the claims-based authentication.

    Wikipedia, 6/29/15

  • ActiveX

     

    A technology introduced by Microsoft in 1996 as part of the OLE framework. It includes a collection of prewritten software components that developers can implement within an application or webpage. This provides a simple way for programmers to add extra functionality to their software or website without needing to write code from scratch. Software add-ons created with ActiveX are called ActiveX controls. These controls can be implemented in all types of programs, but they are most commonly distributed as small Web applications. For example, a basic ActiveX control might display a clock on a webpage. Advanced ActiveX controls can be used for creating stock tickers, interactive presentations, or even Web-based games. ActiveX controls are similar to Java applets, but run through the ActiveX framework rather than the Java Runtime Environment (JRE). This means you must have ActiveX installed on your computer in order to view ActiveX controls in your Web browser. Additionally, when loading a custom ActiveX control within a webpage, you may be prompted to install it. If this happens, you should only accept the download if it is from a trusted source. While ActiveX provide a convenient way for Web developers to add interactive content to their websites, the technology is not supported by all browsers. In fact, ActiveX is only officially supported by Internet Explorer for Windows. Therefore, ActiveX controls are rarely used in today's websites. Instead, most interactive content is published using Flash, JavaScript, or embedded media.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>



     

  • Adapter

     

    A device that allows a specific type of hardware to work with another device that would otherwise be incompatible. Examples of adapters include electrical adapters, video adapters, audio adapters, and network adapters.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>




     

  • Add-on

    A software extension that adds extra features to a program. It may extend certain functions within the program, add new items to the program's interface, or give the program additional capabilities. For example, Mozilla Firefox, a popular Web browser, supports add-ons such as the Google toolbar, ad blockers, and Web developer tools. Some computer games support add-ons that provide extra maps, new characters, or give the player game-editing capabilities.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013.



     

  • Address Bar

    A text field near the top of a Web browser window that displays the URL of the current webpage. The URL, or web address, reflects the address of the current page and automatically changes whenever you visit a new webpage. Therefore, you can always check the location of the webpage you are currently viewing with the browser's address bar.



    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013.



     

  • ADF

    An Automatic Document Feeder is used in copiers and scanners to feed pages into the machine. It allows multiple pages to be copied or scanned at one time without the need to place each individual page in the copier or scanner.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>




     

  • Adware

    A free software that is supported by advertisements. Common adware programs are toolbars that sit on your desktop or work in conjunction with your Web browser. They include features like advanced searching of the Web or your hard drive and better organization of your bookmarks and shortcuts. Adware can also be more advanced programs such as games or utilities. They are free to use, but require you to watch advertisements as long as the programs are open. Since the ads often allow you to click to a Web site, adware typically requires an active Internet connection to run.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. Per Christensson. 7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>




     

  • Alumni Role
    Users with the role of alumni (active alumni) are permitted to access managed resources such as e-mail, calendars, Ozone, printing, etc.






  • Android
    A mobile operating system developed by Google. It is used by several smartphones, such as the Motorola Droid, the Samsung Galaxy, and Google's Nexus One. The Android operating system is based on the open Linux kernel.

    Unlike the iPhone OS, Android is open source, meaning developers can modify and customize the OS for each phone. Therefore, different Android-based phones may have different graphical user interfaces GUIs even though they use the same OS.

    Since several manufacturers make Android-based phones, it is not always easy to tell if a phone is running the Android operating system. If you are unsure what operating system a phone uses, you can often find the system information by selecting About in the Settings menu. The name "Android" comes from the term android, which refers to a robot designed to look and act like a human.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. 2013. Per Christensson.  7 March 2013. <http://www.techterms.com>





  • Anti-virus
    Antivirus software is a type of utility used for scanning and removing viruses from your computer. While many types of antivirus programs exist, their primary purpose is to protect computers from viruses and remove any viruses that are found.

    Tech Terms Dictionary. 2013. Per Christensson.  7 March 2013.